• When Congress passed legislation five years ago to phase out the sale of the incandescent light bulbs that we know so well, it added an incentive for bulb makers. It established a $10 million prize for the bulb-maker that could come up with the most energy efficient bulb that was affordable and met various other goals. The “affordable” new bulb is about to go on the market — for $50 a piece. And taxpayers ponied up $10 million for that.
  • The police chief of a small Texas town has been arrested for falsely obtaining prescription medication, but the rot goes a lot deeper than just a few faked prescriptions, apparently. If you’re one who automatically takes the side of police officers out of pure reflex, read this story and ask yourself how many other cases there are like this out there that we’ll never know about.
  • The father of a high school hockey player is facing criminal charges for shining a laser pointer into the eyes of the goalie of the opposing team from the stands. His daughter’s team won the game and the goalie claims there were after-effects from being hit in the eye with the laser that caused her to play poorly. The guilty party now says, “I feel like a complete jerk. It was very stupid, completely immature for a 42-year-old man to be doing that.” That’s an understatement.

  • Is it now going to be virtually illegal for any bar to allow a patron to get drunk and then leave? First it was established that bars could be held liable for the actions of drunken drivers who kill others. Now comes the notion that a bar is responsible if a drunken patron leaves the bar and does something stupid to get himself killed. After a drunken New Jersey man passed on in a snow bank — after leaving a bar drunk — he was killed by a passing snow plow. His survivors are suing the bar and the city which operated the snow plow.
  • If you wonder why gasoline prices are going up so much right now — at a time of year when demand is normally a bit lower — look no further than the sanctions on Iranian oil that were supposed to magically hurt Iran, but not affect the world oil market. The Freeman makes the case that it’s another example of economic “experts” frequently just having the pretense of knowledge.
  • It’s typically the cultured and refined elite of cities who attend the symphony these days, but it didn’t appear that way in Chicago Thursday night — when a fistfight broke out between two patrons at a symphony concert.